Login Sign Up

Muay Thai Fighters

Muay Thai Fighters

Postby LOPEZSJ » Sat Jan 23, 2010 12:43 am

Im just beginning and wanted to know if theres any tips/secrets you guys know now that you wish you had known earlier? Any thing from techniques, training, weights, diet, cardio?

THANKS ALOT!
LOPEZSJ
White Belt
White Belt
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:27 pm

Re: Muay Thai Fighters

Postby Jons » Thu Feb 18, 2010 10:32 pm

For dieting, my biggest suggestion is eating oatmeal for breakfast. I try to get my long and hard run out of the way in the morning before I eat my breakfast also. If you are training 2x a day, eat the oatmeal BEFORE.

Tips
- work on your balance, this is something a lot of people neglect
- work on controlling your breathing, running is good for this
- footwork, please make sure the proper stance is GLUED into your mind
- get someone who knows what they are doing to hold pads for you as much as you can

talk to whoever is teaching you....
Jons
Blue Belt
Blue Belt
 
Posts: 112
Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2007 10:31 am

Re: Muay Thai Fighters

Postby Kensei » Sat Feb 20, 2010 12:48 pm

Shadow wrote:I know often people will try to hit the bag faster and stronger than there skill level allows. What I'm getting at is, when performing moves, combo, throws, etc. form is the key element (next to mental grasping). Through proper form power and speed will naturally follow. That is a lesson that is hard to learn for beginners. What do the rest of you guys think?.


Totally agree. learn the form first. In Karate we have an understanding that to much free style sparring will KILL your technique. I tend to agree with this. get your basics in and get your techniques down then start sparring and working power and speed. Work on your form and techniqu first. Conditioning is also major for sport fighting. We used to run miles and miles then do sprints to get our cardio in, jump rope and exercise bike time....calisthenics, Plyos, weights were not 100% crazy used but we did do them. Mental training is important but internal spirit comes from tough training and already having "IT". The hardest part for a newbie is not going at it to smash the pads ext. and the worst part is green instructors and poor instructors forget this and teach a student to smash and not just hit the pads ext. Shadow is 200% dead on.

Shadow wrote:As for the diet and workout, I suppose we'd need more information. Like what are starting with weight, height, age. How much time can set aside for daily practice, the dieting most would say is a lifestyle change. The others are probably better suited to answer those. However, I do know something about dieting; however, my workouts are far from hardcore, slightly above moderate maintenance.


For the conditioning it is more where are you starting and what are your goals? Drop weight, test for a new level, sport competition, attract the ladies ext? However again shadow is right, it should not be a "I will eat better for this period and then back to smoking and drinking...and chicken wings!" More info is needed for sure.
Image

Even monkeys fall out of trees!
Kensei
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 6233
Joined: Mon Sep 11, 2006 7:12 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Muay Thai Fighters

Postby Kensei » Sat Mar 06, 2010 2:20 pm

Shadow wrote:Question Kensei: In regards to the too much sparring kills technique. Could you elaborate on that? I can understand that when you don't have the form and know-how, but after that how is spar too much bad, other than the obvious recovery time for injury? How can it kill technique in "mid or later" stages, and I use the mid and later stages loosely?

I was talking about beginners! even intermediate students should avoid training free style to much. The idea of "scoring points" usually causes a loss of technique. Begginner studetns and intermediate students should focus on pushing their technique and limiting the amount of free sparring. Even when free sparring they should focus on good techniques.

By the time you do Advanced free style the students should still go back to learning basic techniques and drilling in them. The fact is that all the students I have worked with who went to soon to free style sparring ended up dropping form. I have one gal that trained with me and then went to Muay Thai, her instructor threw her into free style to soon and she lost all her form. I met her after a fight and she commented that her form is slipping. She told her instructor and he said "form is not important"...She lost her next four fights. Came back and trained with me two days a week and won her next three fights and has a fourth coming up. Repetition of proper form is the only way to build form and technique. (well one of the few), but rushing into free style and dropping basic techniques is a great way to slow your progress and reverse it over time.
Image

Even monkeys fall out of trees!
Kensei
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 6233
Joined: Mon Sep 11, 2006 7:12 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Muay Thai Fighters

Postby Kensei » Tue Mar 09, 2010 7:57 pm

Shadow wrote: What do you thing about this. I sparred my fair share of beginners. One thing they all seem to have in common is there absorbtion of information. I tell them your closing your eyes, your head is too low, your telegraphing this or that. They never seem to be able to change it then. I try to get my workout in, but I never spar in a way where the other person is not is a position to learn (at the early stages). Do you think that is the case, as with the underlined above?


I have seen this as well, dont take it personal but most of the time it is because the person that is "teaching" them the student does not see as a teacher...not only that but most newbies have a hard time finding their gym shorts somtimes. Patience and let them know that you are a good instructor even if you are not the "Sensei, Kru, Sifu ext".

Shadow wrote:Sidenote of slight comedy: I was sparring the beginner guys. Well, mid fight this guy just throws a round and kicks me right in the side of the head :shock: . Didn't block, evade, flinch, nothing. The whole class was like, OOOOOOHH :lol: ! The guy said, sorry. I told don't apoligize for a good hit (well within the rule), good shot. I totally too loose and didn't consider him a threat. The funny thing is I seen it coming could of blocked it or evaded, but my brain was still in chill mode. Of course, opening with a blitz combo attack and dominating virtually the entire fight, I couldn't let him off that easy. However, I did just hold back and let him attack. He finally just gave up after 100% was blocked. (and no I don't just fight beginners/just got nail embarrissly by one).
We seldomly talk about this side, but theirs the darkside of advanced being too comfident. Has being too cocky or comfident ever got you in trouble?

I have to say any one that says they have never been shocked by a newbie and "caught" is either full of shit or has not really trained to hard. I have been cauth a few times and it is always funny when you think back to it!
Image

Even monkeys fall out of trees!
Kensei
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 6233
Joined: Mon Sep 11, 2006 7:12 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Muay Thai Fighters

Postby Moldaz » Sun Oct 17, 2010 2:13 am

Body conditioning and bone conditioning, Hindu pushups, Hindu squats, gymnastics, calisthenics, weight training... all the aforementioned exercises can and will help you in training in your chosen martial art.
Of all the things I have lost, I miss my mind the most.
- Mark Twain.
Moldaz
Yellow Belt
Yellow Belt
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2010 1:35 am
Location: Ballarat, Australia.


Return to Boxing, Kickboxing & Muay Thai

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron